sf03 is part of the airhorn debate club

21 07 2011

I’ll say in advance that Phoenix Wright has the right idea.

I wasn’t sure I could get this update out the door in time. I finished literally five minutes before it was supposed to be posted. My outline isn’t quite FINISHED… but I have solid, scene-by-scene notes all the way up to the third act. And some vague ideas for the third act. Time to tap dance on a hot plate again for your amusement!

Things have been a little bit insane and stressful RL, too. Craziness in both my jobs, lots of events to attend, some NDA-based things I’m in on which you honestly wouldn’t care about, and so on. I need to juggle all these things better, because my physical health’s a-sufferin’. What I’m saying is: If you don’t see fresh story here on time, well, thanks in advance for your patience.

I did manage to squeeze out the complete intro to sf03, at least. I hope you dig it. Feedback welcome.

Edit: Added the new paragraphs to the end of each scene, to emphasize that Scout hasn’t achieved perfect mastery quite yet. New text in bold.

At the end of Scout’s scene:

He could hear the arguing voices, through the heavy iron door. His wife’s voice had taken a frustrated pitch to it, the kind she got when she realized she was in over her head.

There would be a risk, of course. He had only just begun to apply this new tactical method to his hunt. It would take some time to fully understand his new prey, to be able to cut it off at every turn. But… when things were at their bleakest in his last tenure as a Winterhound, Emily refused to let him stay in hiding. She was there for him. And now, he had to be here for her. He had to be willing to take the first step back into their lives together, no matter the danger.

Scout grasped the handle of the door, and pushed.

At the end of the common room scene:

It was an unexpected voice. She twisted in her seat, eyes wide not in fear, but surprise… and relief.

He had finally come out of hiding. She could still see the little muscle twitches under his skin, could tell he was still struggling against his darker nature… but he wasn’t doing it in the cold and the dark anymore. He was out here, ready to face it… and to help her face the current problem with a new perspective.

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399 responses

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.
Typo.
“That title was not of my choosing!”
Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.
Typo.
“That title was not of my choosing!”
Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
loopychew

The floor did not yeild when Scout pounded his fist into it.

Typo.

“That title was not of my choosing!”

Elriel had shouted at them.

Separating those two sentences without something in between makes it seem as if it were two independent actions. Adding a pause, perhaps just an ellipsis as a paragraph or maybe something like “silence permeated the room,” would give more of a link between the two.

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.
And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.
And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
lirazel

I think Scout’s gaining a measure of control is good. But that happened awfully fast. After days of work, ONE suggestion is all that’s needed? I know you want to get the plot going, but I think that needs a tad more.

And it probably will need to slip a time or two. What happens when Scout sleeps?

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.
EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.
EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

It’ll take more work than this, clearly — but it was enough to get him to face the possibility of leaving confinement. Maybe I can rejigger the text so that he sees this as a first step only. But I need him collected enough to pitch in at the end of that discussion without twitching constantly.

EDIT: I think I’ve managed to address this with some edits. See the post above for a summary.

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.
Nice tense argument scene.
And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.
Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.
Nice tense argument scene.
And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.
Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
jengagne

I agree that Scout got the hang of Taamusi’s technique remarkably fast. On the other hand, he’s a very tactical person, so I can see it working. Hmm.

Nice tense argument scene.

And Scout comes out to make a great point about how to approach the soul issue. Excellent.

Typo brigade: howed, yeild
Missing words: aware my own, even if it horrifying
Needs hyphen: brother in arms, head on

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
loopychew

Those edits work.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

Reminds me a bit of the edits to have Benny NOT give Randall a holy message at the end of lf06, and the edits I still need to do to clarify how Una sacrificed herself. Things that are critical to understanding, but not too difficult to patch in.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
lirazel

To me, these are the things that make character development believeable. Stuff tthat films rarely do well — you need the words.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.
They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.
They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.
I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.
They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.
It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.
They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.
They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.
I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.
They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.
It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

21 07 2011
Anonymous

There’s a lot of conclusion-jumping about these “souls”. A lot of things the characters are assuming don’t directly follow from what they know.

They haven’t really proven that what they’re looking at are souls. They’ve found something that seems a lot like our vague notions of souls, but it doesn’t seem to encapsulate the entirety of a person’s being, and NanoSeattle gets by just fine without it. (How did they learn that about NanoSeattle, anyway?) For all they know, what they’re calling “souls” could be more analogous to a component of the endocrine system than to the brain; important, and your emotions won’t work right without it, but theoretically replaceable without changing who you fundamentally are, possibly even replaceable with a non-aleph-based substitute.

They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife. Transit to the afterlife could be based on brain scanning or some other method that doesn’t depend directly on a person possessing their original supply of aleph radiation. In particular, if the Word made any effort to accommodate NanoSeattle or other non-aleph-based sapient life, the same mechanism should work on soul-sacrificed people. Of course, even if soul-sacrificed people get an afterlife, they’re still pretty messed up with their aleph radiation sucked out, so there’s still a big problem.

I don’t think they’ve even proved they get an afterlife. I don’t recall anything ever explicitly confirming the existence of an afterlife, although I might be forgetting something. There are angels and demons, but the spoiler timeline says they were only told about 1 universe, so they’ve probably never seen any dead people showing up from other universes. There are several ways people from other universes could get an afterlife without letting the angels in on the secret, but we don’t know what the Word actually set up.

They don’t know that souls used for power are destroyed. It might just be that they go to the afterlife.

It’s likely a lot of these questions will get definite answers pretty soon, but the characters think they already know. They’re making natural assumptions, but their assumptions already cost them with the zombies, and I would have expected Elisa at least to have learned from that. Maybe she has and just isn’t bringing it up.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.
Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.
Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
lirazel

NanoSeattle is introduced in Forsaken Shores, and so is Jen.

Your other questions are interesting. Certainly, based on London’s Fog, there’s no information about afterlife. There does seem to be a strong genetic relationship between spiritual and physical traits, though.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.
If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?
Except angels and demons exist.
Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.
They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.
If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?
Except angels and demons exist.
Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.
They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

The doubt that souls even exist is what allows the Ascendancy to use them as a power source. After all, it’s not cosmic horror if it’s simple and scientific — just some excess of energy which is being drained, and all this nonsense about immortal souls is just backwards thinking superstition.

If not for the unusual dampening effect it has, no doubt they’d encourage ALL their citizens to give up their souls for the cause of the Ascendancy. After all, only children and idiots believe such things have any value or worth, correct?

Except angels and demons exist.

Once you’ve got that staring at you in the face, you have to consider: maybe you’re wrong about souls being a silly children’s story. Maybe it’s not just a matter of spinal fluids and endocrines. Maybe there’s more to this, something vast, which if lost to oblivion would be an unthinkable horror. Imagine that you DID exist beyond what we know as life, forever, in some form. Now imagine that taken away from you because someone wanted to run a Cold Fun machine for a few more days.

They’re making a lot of assumptions, true. They don’t know a lot. That’s why they’re about to go to talk to Benny the Broker, to get some answers, and understand what they’re facing. But they can’t risk that it might not be some simple matter of biology.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.
Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.
Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.
RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.
I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.
Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.
Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.
RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.
I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

You’re right that they “They haven’t proven that this aleph radiation is what continues to the afterlife” … but they don’t need to prove that for it to affect their actions or decisions in the story, methinks.

Just the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that souls are destroyed, is enough to make Our Heroes play it conservatively as they try to make ethical decisions.

Yes, assumptions have already cost them in other situations — but with this situation they can’t ethically afford NOT to make these assumptions.

RE: NanoSeattle it’s not spelled out explicitly in this chapter, but we/they know that aleph radiation is directly associated with biological life, biological growth, organic things… I assume machines ain’t got it. I mean, I doubt Tillman would be able to channel aleph to encourage a nano-plant to grow.

I obviously know nothing about the Word in this storyverse and I doubt we ever will know, but my wishful thinking imagines that if there is an afterlife, it’s for sentient beings regardless of whatever they were made of / radiation they were full of before they were destroyed.

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).
So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.
Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?
To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.
As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.
So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.
But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).
So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.
Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?
To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.
As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.
So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.
But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
jengagne

Come to think of it, there seems to be a certain ambient amount of aleph that’s not tied up in living organisms and it can be pulled directly out of nature itself (Tillman channeling aleph-lightning, the solar-aleph project on the Moon).

So although I still wouldn’t assume the nanobots use the same mechanism, there’s apparently more to aleph than just souls. It’s a byproduct of life-giving processes, or something.

Regardless, we do know from Fae lore that the Sacrifice spell is specifically declared to sacrifice “souls” or whatever passes for them. So whether the soul is moving along WITH the aleph radiation or if it IS the aleph radiation, who knows?

To make a longwinded answer short, I think the character’s decisions and beliefs so far jive.

As for how they knew the Ascendancy’s real motive for going to “help” NanoSeattle, that’s an open question, I agree. I think it makes sense given these items:
1) They know the Ascendancy is using social conversion programs, considering the Ascendancy is open about that.
2) The Ascendancy is also open about what cities they occupy, and there’s also tourist traffic to/from Seattle.

So between 1 and 2, I can buy it as an established public or semi-public fact that social conversion doesn’t work on NanoSeattlites.

But your question was “how do they know NS doesn’t have souls?” and I’d say the answer is, they still don’t know. They just know social conversion doesn’t work on them so presumably they lack aleph radiation (and as noted, maybe aleph IS the soul as opposed to being inextricably linked to souls of organics.)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.
My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.
My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

22 07 2011
Anonymous

If you go by Christian theology, there’s actually much more evidence that NanoSeattle has an immortal soul than that Los Muertos do. NanoSeattle can pass Turing tests, easily; it has goals and purposes, makes and executes plans, and demonstrates all the rational faculties. Most importantly, NanoSeattle understands moral arguments and has a conscience. The zombies can’t do any of that. Now, sf02 shows the people infected by the zombie network are still present, though barely conscious; they’re crippled humans, that is, not just reanimated corpses as we previously took them to be. But it should not be possible for any being to behave as NanoSeattle does and not have an immortal soul.

My own theory is that the Sacrifice ritual fails on NanoSeattle because the city is just too big for it. Sacrificing one human-sized fragment of the city has the same effect as sacrificing a single human finger (namely, none); the ritual would have to encompass the whole city to be sure of capturing its soul, and the option to capture every soul in a city at once probably isn’t available in the standard ritual. (That allows for the possibility of Lar developing or discovering a variant spell that can Sacrifice every soul in a city at once …)

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?
Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.
Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.
(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)
As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.
And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.
For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.
I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?
Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.
Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.
(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)
As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.
And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.
For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.
I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

Jen here. Yeah, it’s an interesting topic to contemplate even aside from what the characters must think, eh?

Yep, NS can individually and collectively passing Turing tests, rationality, etc.

Perhaps the soul-related trick about NS is that most of them are not permanent individuals. A few are… Jen Cooke, the Mayor, the museum guy whose name I forget. So perhaps it doesn’t work on the typical person in NS, but for all we know Jen and the Mayor may have their own souls.

(And again, I wouldn’t assume that having a soul necessarily ALWAYS corresponds with possession of extractable aleph radiation. We’ve seen that the two factors relate to each other in biologicals but that’s all we can really assume.)

As for Los Muertos and immortal souls… interestingly, we’ve seen that LM canpass Turing tests, make plans, be rational, etc. as the Network — given a proper router, Maria. There’s also some indication of that as individuals; even in its current corrupted state the Network itself states “The enemy is destroying our souls.” The nodes (zombie people) seem to have their own strong priorities beyond just the network’s priority.

And speaking of corruption, that’s interesting too. The Network states it has been corrupted by a “cannibal meme”. Before that, it had “the ageless perfection of shared minds.” So this is not the Network’s natural state either.

For all we know, people may have led relatively normal individual or semi-individual lives within the Network on their home Earth before this corruption occurred.

I am left wondering whether the 12:1 aleph ratio in Los Muertos is because they’re corrupted, because they’ve gone hundreds of years with essentially no food and the aleph is fading as a result, or what. Either way I wouldn’t assume they have no souls or only 1/12 souls — they certainly seem plenty motivated on both the cannibalism front but also with individual and religious concern about what’s happening to them… motivated until they get sacrificed, that is.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.
It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.
I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.
If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.
Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…
I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.
It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.
I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.
If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.
Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…
I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Anonymous

P.S. from Jen: To clarify, I do think you’re right about Seattle and its soul. It’s interesting that Seattle seems to have only gradually achieved true sentience — when they first showed up, they mowed down the original Seattle without it mattering at all.

It’s as if somehow, going through the motions of BEING Seattle has gradually given the city a soul. Now they have their own motivation independent of their original programming, and it matters to them if they hurt outsiders, etc.

I still would bet that the individual-type Seattleites would have their own souls too, as sort of children of the city.

If it would be possible to Sacrifice some or all of Seattle, I wonder what the resulting nanobots would be like. Would they simply have their original programming to go by and become re-weaponized, eating the Orbital mages? But that programming would also drive them to rejoin the city collective, at which point they’d probably return to normal.

Maybe you could whittle away at the city’s soul bit by bit in this manner…

I’m sure the city is very interesting to the Ascendancy tactically for a variety of reasons. Hopefully they won’t have enough time to work all that out.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.
This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.
This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
Stefan "Twoflower" Gagne

I’m going to leave it vague as to whether Seattle and its denizens have souls or not. But regardless, the Ascendancy can’t detect any there, based on what they’ve come to understand the soul to be, and the spell can’t access it if it is there. So, the assumption on their behalf is no souls.

This is actually quite important for one of the retail bonus stories, but I won’t say why.

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…
Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…
Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

23 07 2011
jengagne

On a related note…

Kryten: Oh, it’s not the end for me, sir, it’s just the beginning. I have served my human masters, now I can look forward to my reward in Silicon Heaven.
Lister: Silicon WHAT?
Kryten: Surely you’ve heard of Silicon Heaven?
Lister: Has it got anything to do with being stuck opposite Brigitte Nielsen in a packed lift?
Kryten: No, sir. It’s the electronic afterlife. It’s the gathering place for the souls of all electronic equipment. Robots, toasters, calculators. It’s our final resting place.
Lister: I don’t mean to say anything out of place here, Kryten, but that is completely whacko Jacko. There is no such thing as ‘Silicon Heaven’.
Kryten: Then where do all the calculators go?

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
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24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

24 07 2011
Anonymous

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ילדות הפאוור פאף: הסרט הרשת החברתית
טרה ספרנסה תודה שעישנתם

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